Lifestyle


Smoking bans- no butts about it

09 July, 2008 19:23  EasyExpat EasyExpat

Smoking bans seem to be all the rage with governments these days. A rash of bans have sprouted especially in Europe in recent years. A number of countries have joined the non-smoking wagon and a number of others are scrambling for their turn to join in.

Different countries have implemented the ban to different degrees. Some countries like Albania, Ireland, Cyprus, England, Iceland, Estonia, Finland, Scotland and recently Netherlands and France have opted to go completely smoke-free and ban smoking in all work places and public buildings including restaurants and cafes. Some countries have chosen to tread a bit more lightly. Austria for example bans smoking in public buildings open to children and young people but does not include work places. Others like Germany agreed to ban smoking in restaurants and pubs but will allow exemptions for small bars and premises with separate smoking rooms. Spain, Slovakia and Slovenia have allowed smoking in separate zones in pubs and restaurants. Switzerland imposes partial restriction on indoor workplaces and Luxembourg imposes a total ban on advertising and sponsoring smoking and a partial ban on smoking in public places.

The list is not limited to Europe alone. In recent years, many countries around the world including Australia, Argentina, Brazil, Canada, Singapore and a number of states in the Untied States have banned smoking in public areas. From the above, it’s clear the world wants to go smoke-free. Below are some key effects of such a move. (More)

   


Survival Tips for the Expat Spouse

06 May, 2008 19:16  EasyExpat EasyExpat

You’ve moved into your new house, gone shopping, explored the town center, visited the library, marveled at the architecture and then that nagging question looms up again, “What do I do now?” You’re friendless, jobless, clueless. But not to worry, things aren’t that hopeless. Here’s what you can do to keep your sanity and maybe even your career on the right track!

Start with the language: You’ll feel extremely proud of yourself in your first week in your new home country. This might have something to do with the fact that you can utter your own version of ‘good morning’ and ‘thank you’ in the local language. Unfortunately there’s more to it than those two precious words. If you plan to stay in your new country for more than a year, join a language course. The sooner you learn the language, the faster you get on with life. Most companies sponsor private courses for expatriate spouses. This however depends on the contract, company and the country you’re living in. If it’s not part of the deal, check your options on the internet. Most language schools tend to be in centrally located areas. Take a stroll in the city centre and you’re bound to stumble upon one of them. (More)

   


Petite Anglaise

29 February, 2008 18:33  EasyExpat EasyExpat

Petite Anglaise2006 was definitely a big year for Petite Anglaise: "dumped, dooced and outed, but also snagged a book deal" according to her own words.

Petite Anglaise was blogging under anonymous coverage about her life in Paris, that she made home 10 years ago, the familiar expat gripes, and sometime evolving to talk about her relationship and single motherhood, writing always with talent that was awarded several times by satin pyjamas.

Catherine Sanderson (the English Bridget Jones as she was described by the Daily Telegraph) became even more famous the day when the stupid-old fashion company where she was working in, the now condemned British accountancy firm Dixon Wilson, decided to fire her for gross misconduct [1] (that is the name they gave for having a blog). (More)

   


Recycling more

25 September, 2005 20:13  EasyExpat EasyExpat

 

I am not professing to become a recycling green guru overnight but below are a few things one can do to help the environment.

  1. Use energy saving bulbs. Switch off all appliances on 'standby' mode including mobile phone chargers when not in use.
  2. Off-set individual CO2 emissions by planting trees/making donations to organisations who plant trees. For more information, visit http://www.futureforests.com , http://www.carbonneutral.com
  3. Think about the food you eat. Buy organic food and/or food that has been produced/sourced locally where possible.
  4. Recycle as much as you can.
    • Paper, glass, plastic, cans...: Contact your local authority to view the services they provide. Most supermarket car-parks have recycling facilities.
    • Old mobile phones: Donate to a friend in need (one who has a phone that is falling apart or is the size of a brick) or return to the retailer or charity shop for recycling.
    • Clothes: Drop off at a charity recycling point.
    • Computer: http://www.donateapc.org.uk
    • Electronic goods: Donate furniture and electronic goods eg computers, TV's fridges etc. to organisations who will services these items and pass on to low-income families. Contact Furniture Reuse Network for list. http://www.frn.org.uk
  5. Travel by air only when necessary. Offset CO2 emissions by planting trees or ask your company to do so. See 2 above and http://www.climatecare.org
  6. Buy recycled products where possible (It's stupid to wipe your bum with virgin toilet paper when all you are doing is throwing it back down the loo) or second hand goods such as i-pods, laptops, etc.
  7. Use public transport where possible. I know it is not much fun on a Monday morning, being stuck under someone's armpit, but think you are doing something good by not using the car for that particular journey. People with smelly armpits, please wash.
  8. Learn more about green and recycling issues.


Do a search on the internet - the list is endless.

L.

 

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