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How Bad is Traffic in your City?

05 October, 2011 10:39  Erin Erin

Traffic © Urbanhearts - Fotolia.comThe IBM Global Commuter Pain Survey finds that many people have crossed their pain threshold for traffic and congestion. With more than one billion cars on the road worldwide, an increasing number of respondents say that roadway traffic has increased their levels of personal stress and anger.

As quickly as cities construct better public transportation systems and attend to commuter issues, the growth in cities results in greater need. Interestingly, the people surveyed note that traffic is down, but their tolerance for it is lower than before. Globally, 69 percent of those surveyed indicated that traffic has negatively affected their health in some way. About 42 percent of the respondents globally reported increased stress and 35 percent reported increased anger.

City Rankings

The IBM Commuter Pain Index graphs the emotional and economic toll of commuting in 20 international cities (the lower the less pain). 8,042 commuters in 20 cities on six continents were surveyed.

    The index is comprised of these issues:
  • Commuting Time
  • Time stuck in Traffic
  • Agreement that- price of gas is already too high, traffic has gotten worse, start-stop traffic is a problem, driving causes stress, driving causes anger, traffic affects work, traffic so bad driving stopped, and decided not to make trip due to traffic.

Montreal

SCORE: 21

London

SCORE: 23

Chicago

SCORE: 25

Stockholm

SCORE: 26

Toronto

SCORE: 27

New York City

SCORE: 28

Madrid

SCORE: 28

Paris

SCORE: 31

Los Angeles

SCORE: 34

Buenos Aires

SCORE: 42

Singapore

SCORE: 44

Milan

SCORE: 53

Moscow

SCORE: 65
The commuters of Moscow spend among the longest amount of time (36 minutes or more) on the road to get to their workplace or school.

New Delhi

SCORE: 72
Respiratory problems due to traffic congestion are most prevalent in China and India.

Bangalore

SCORE: 75

Johannesburg

SCORE: 83

Nairobi

SCORE: 88
Despite it's negative score, 70 percent of Nairobi residents report taking public transit more often in the last year on their daily commute.

Beijing

SCORE: 95

Shenzhen

SCORE: 95

Mexico City

SCORE: 108
Mexico City is working to improve it's position with an investment of $2.5 billion to better support the growing demands of its transportation network in one of the most populated urban areas in the world. However, they still have the longest amount of time on the road to get to their workplace or school.

The full report on the IBM survey findings can be found here.

Increased Reliance on Public Transportation

There is increased interest and progress in public transportation. Perhaps the biggest change is the commitment of regular commuters to public transit. Of those surveyed, 41 percent believe improved public transit would help reduce traffic congestion. In some of the cities that surveyed as the worst, there is the largest commitment to increasing transportation options. With the increased focus on public transportation options, there is hope that commutes will continue to go down and people will be happier making them.

   



         
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